Here's one of the rarest and most desirable L-00 variants ever produced! Lately folks have rightly recognized that the L-00's made in 1933 are some of the best 14 fret small body guitars ever made and the rare few made with solid linings are the cream of the crop. The small sunburst guitars are rare enough but no more than a handful were made with the older "Tuxedo" black and white finish making this guitar about as rare and cool as it can possibly get!

This particular guitar has been restored and while sporting a few condition issues (more below) has the tone that these are famous for. A wonderful fingerpicker of course, but one of the finest sounding guitars for fiddle back-up I have ever heard. A 1933 L-00 loves a flatpick more than you might imagine and early country and bluegrass styles are where this guitar really sounds incredible! 

Specs:
1 3/4" Nut 2 3/8" bridge spacing 24.75" scale length
Adirondack Spruce top Mahogany back sides and neck Solid (not kerfed) Mahogany Linings
Early 1930's V neck carve is a little more manageable than the more common mid-late 1930's carve Action set to a hair over 2.5/32" (5/64") and 3.5/32" (7/64") with saddle to come down if needed Fresh re-fret with neck relief of 8/1000"

Repairs in the past (reported to have been performed by Joel Whitehead) include: Back was removed and 4 cracks reglued Slightly oversize bridge plate was installed to combat a pretty good belly Original full height bridge was reglued with finish touchup around the bridge area Treble front leg of the X brace crack was glued Side crack repaired
Two major and a couple very small top cracks resulting from a treble lower bout drop/crunch repaired.
Some of the top binding is shrinking away from the waist but poses no threat.

All of this work is solid and functional but not performed perfectly or invisibly.

An interesting quirk of this guitar is that the neck was very overset at the factory and so the neck has a headplate and shim under the fingerboard. These are absolutely factory original and under untouched factory finish and just the kind of thing Gibson would do the 1930's if someone on the line accidentally overset a neck. This sort of Gibson thing always makes me smile and is probably the reason this guitar got a black finish instead of the new sunburt finish. Black would hide the shim!
Since the neck was overset to start with it has not needed a neck reset and has a very good angle (a straight edge on the frets projects right to the top surface of the bridge) and has a 5/32" tall saddle with 2.5-3.5/32" action. The bridge and fingerboard are original and the only work I performed on this guitar was a refret with modern medium fretwire. It plays great!

The original brass three on a plate tuners are a little cranky but hold well and function just fine. The A string peg is stiff but they're too cool to change in my opinion. A set of the Stew mac restoration tuners would drop in with no modification, just keep the original tuners with the guitar if you do that please!

Check out the demo video for a sound clip. The first guitar in the video is this 1933 Gibson L-00 and the second guitar is a bench copy I made of it. This guitar has become a shop reference for a really good L-00!  
Free shipping in the lower 48 in a brand new TKL flattop case. The Brazilian rosewood would make international shipping a long and expensive process ($75 for the export permit and 3+ weeks to process), so USA only.

Listeda month ago
ConditionGood (Used)
Good condition items function properly but may exhibit some wear and tear.learn more
Brand
Model
Finish
Categories
Year
Made In
  • United States
Fretboard Material
Body Shape
Right / Left Handed
Number of Strings
Neck Material
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Top Material
Back Material
Sides Material

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Minerva Fretworks

Rossville, GA, United States
Sales:35
Joined Reverb:2016

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